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Hematology

Hematology Test

We offer a variety of Hematology group tests for both mammalian and non-mammalian species. Please refer to the detailed hematology group test list for additional testing information. Brief information on the more commonly used group tests are given below.

Hematology Test
Hematology Test
Hematology Test
Hematology Test

Blood Biochemistry Test

Blood Biochemistry Test to the chemical analysis of blood serum. A profile of tests can be combined to evaluate renal function, electrolyte metabolism, serum proteins, digestion, injury, lipids, pancreatic function, and the liver. Specialized chemistry testing can also be undertaken to assess thyroid glands and liver function.
In veterinary clinical pathology, serum biochemistry testing presents the challenges of species differences and low volume samples. Automated analyzers for veterinary use have been implemented to provide a precision to sample analysis.

Blood Biochemistry
Hormonal Assaying

Hormonal Assaying Test

A Hormonal Assaying test is performed to give an indication of metabolic processes and conditions, or ‘hormone imbalance’. Many hormones can be measured (assayed) in the blood, including male and female sex hormones (oestrogen, progesterone, testosterone) and hormones secreted by other glands such as the parathyroid and adrenal glands.
Specific hormones or sets of related hormones may be tested in a variety of clinical situations. Commonly, hormonal tests may be related to issues of fertility, menstrual irregularities, or menopause.

Serology Test

The Serology Section of the Animal Health Diagnostic Center develops and uses fully validated serological assays to detect antibodies or antigens as indicators for infectious diseases in production animals, companion animals, and zoo species. Assays are validated according to criteria published in the OIE International Standards Manual for serological assays. Quality control, with accurate and reproducible results, is our primary goal. Test results are interpreted to inform veterinarians beyond the usual serological values that are reported.

Serology
Urine And Fecal Examination

Urine & Fecal Examination

Veterinary assistants routinely perform several urine tests that are helpful to the veterinarian in making or confirming a diagnosis. Urinalysis procedures include Preparing slide for blood smear.
Examining fecal samples for the presence of worm eggs and larvae and protozoa trophozoites and cysts is a common practice in most veterinary clinics.

Urine & Fecal Examination
Urine & Fecal Examination
Urine & Fecal Examination

Skin Examination

Skin Examination diseases requires a detailed history, physical examination, and appropriate diagnostic tests. Many skin diseases look alike, and a definitive diagnosis is made over time by including or excluding possible causes, evaluating responses to therapy, and/or process of elimination.
A careful dermatologic history is critical to interpret the physical examination findings and choose appropriate diagnostic tests. A complete general history should be obtained, including information about prior illnesses, vaccinations, husbandry (housing, feeding practices, etc), changes in attitude and food consumption, elimination practices, exposure to other animals, and travel within the past 6–12 mo. This should be followed by a detailed dermatologic history. Use of a preprinted history form can be very useful for chronic or complicated cases.

Skin Examination
Skin Examination
Skin Examination
Skin Examination
Skin Examination
Blood Protozoan Examination

Blood Protozoan Examination

Blood protozoan Examination are significant to animal breeding as they result in economic loss due to mortality, reduction in production efficiency and increment in drugs usage. This historical retrospective study was carried out to investigate the most significant blood protozoan diseases, their trends as well as the host range diagnosed by Veterinary Research Institute (VRI) among Malaysian domestic animals. Conventional techniques such as stained thin blood film, whole blood buffy coat examination and direct wet smears were utilised for diagnosis. Five most common significant blood protozoan diseases from the domestic animals were identified namely, theileriosis, leucocy tozoonosis, plasmodiasis, babesiosis and t r y panosomiasis respectively.

Culture & Sensitivity Test

A Culture & Sensitivity is a two-step process. To do the culture, the sample from your pet’s infection is spread on the surface of a petri dish of agar. This is a jelly that is specifically formulated to encourage bacterial growth. Colonies of organisms can be seen after 24 hours. Every colony is then individually spread on agar to isolate each species of bacteria. These bacteria colonies are then further examined to determine their type.

Culture And Sensitivity
Biopsy

Biopsy

A Biopsy is the surgical removal and microscopic examination of a sample of tissue from a suspicious lesion. The most common biopsies are a punch biopsy (where a small, circular amount of tissue is removed using a biopsy punch), a wedge biopsy (where a wedge of representative tissue is removed from the mass, or an excision biopsy (where the entire mass is excised or removed).
In some cases, a small amount of the lesion is sampled because removal of the whole tumor is impossible. A small biopsy can also be useful before surgery to plan the surgical approach or other treatments that can increase the chances of a successful outcome. However, in many cases, particularly where it is easy to get good surgical margins around the mass, it is more appropriate to remove the whole lump.

Specialized Tests

Blood protozoa, Serum based allergy testing, Distemper, Parvo-virus, Hemoprotozoan& Kit test etc..